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William Of Effingham Howard Lord and Catherine Broughton



Husband William Of Effingham Howard Lord 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1572 1
         Buried: 


         Father: Duke Thomas Howard Of Norfolk (1443-1524) 1 2 3 4 5 6
         Mother: Agnes Tilney Lady (      -1545) 1 3 6 7


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Margaret Gamage (      -1535) 1 3




Wife Catherine Broughton 1 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Apr 1535 - Some Say Died 1531. 1
         Buried:  - Lambeth Church, Surrey


         Father: John Broughton (Bef 1489-1517) 3
         Mother: Anne Sapcote (      -1558) 3



   Other Spouse: William Howard Lord Howard (Abt 1510-1572) 1 3 5 7 - Bef 18 Jun 1531



William Howard Lord Howard and Catherine Broughton



Husband William Howard Lord Howard 1 3 5 7

           Born: Abt 1510
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Jan 1572 - Hampton Court Palace, Richmond, England 1 5
         Buried: 29 Jan 1572 - Reigate Church 8


         Father: Duke Thomas Howard Of Norfolk (1443-1524) 1 2 3 4 5 6
         Mother: Agnes Tilney Lady (      -1545) 1 3 6 7


       Marriage: Bef 18 Jun 1531

   Other Spouse: Margaret Gamage (      -1535) 1 3 - Abt 1536

   Other Spouse: Gertrude Lyte (      -      ) 1




Wife Catherine Broughton 1 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Apr 1535 - Some Say Died 1531. 1
         Buried:  - Lambeth Church, Surrey


         Father: John Broughton (Bef 1489-1517) 3
         Mother: Anne Sapcote (      -1558) 3



   Other Spouse: William Of Effingham Howard Lord (      -1572) 1



Children
1 F Agnes (Anne) Howard 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Paulet (      -1598) 3




General Notes (Husband)

1 UPDA 2 DATE 11 MAR 1553 2 PLAC Acceded:Effingham


Created Lord Howard 11 March 1554 The Complete Peerage does not show the children.


Charles William Rouse Broughton Sir Bart.



Husband Charles William Rouse Broughton Sir Bart. (details suppressed for this person)

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       Marriage: 




Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Children
1 F Louisa Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: St. Andrew St. John 13th Baron (      -1817) 3 7





Roger E. Demarest and Connie Jean Broughton



Husband Roger E. Demarest (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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       Marriage: 




Wife Connie Jean Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: John C. Broughton
         Mother: Polly Ann Perry





Children
1 F Elisabeth Ann Demarest (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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2 F Rachel Kennet Demarest (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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3 M David Matthew Demarest (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Ralph Verney Sir and Elizabeth Broughton



Husband Ralph Verney Sir 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1525
         Buried: 


         Father: John Verney Sir (1450-1505) 3
         Mother: Margaret Whittingham (      -1509) 3


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Margaret Iwardby (      -      ) 3

   Other Spouse: Anne Weston (      -      ) 3




Wife Elizabeth Broughton 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



William Thornbrugh and Elizabeth Broughton



Husband William Thornbrugh (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: William Thornbrugh
         Mother: Elinor Musgrave


       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Anne Thornbrugh (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thomas Preston (living)





Frederick Johnston and Elizabeth Broughton



Husband Frederick Johnston 9

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Broughton 9

           Born: 1764 - SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

Noted events in her life were:
• Census, Pickens District, SC, 1850



Children
1 F Sarah Johnston 9

           Born: 1782 - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1849
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thomas Garvin (1775-1859) 9





William Thornborough and Elizabeth Broughton



Husband William Thornborough 6

           Born: Abt 1503 - Of Hampsfield In, Craven, England 6
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Broughton 6

           Born: Abt 1505 6
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Rowland Thornborough 6

           Born: Abt 1529 6
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Margaret Middleton (Abt 1531-      ) 6





Jessie W. Sullins and Elizabeth Frances (Eliza) Broughton



Husband Jessie W. Sullins 10

           Born: 14 Jan 1873 - Probably Rock Castle, , Kentucky, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Jun 1948 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 22 Jun 1948 - Eural Cemetery, , Beckham Co., OK, , ,


         Father: William Franklin Sullins (1839-1886) 10
         Mother: Ruth(Ie) Howard (1837-1903) 10


       Marriage: 11 Dec 1895 - Washita Co., Oklahoma Territory, , ,

Noted events in his life were:
• Census, Elk Twp., , Washita Co., OK, , ,, 12 Jul 1900

p. 104B, #661

• Occupation, a farmer and rancher

• Probate, 15 Jun 1949

• Census, Washita Co., OK, , ,, 1910

ED 261, Sh 233




Wife Elizabeth Frances (Eliza) Broughton 10

            AKA: Eliza (Broughton) Sullins
           Born: 31 Dec 1877 - Santo, Palo Pinto Co., TX, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 May 1979 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 20 May 1979 - Eural Cemetery, , Beckham Co., OK, , ,


         Father: James C. (Jim) Broughton (      -      ) 10
         Mother: Nancy Clark (      -      ) 10



Noted events in her life were:
• Residence, Cloud Chief, , Oklahoma Territory, , ,, After 14 Feb 1889



Children
1 F Nora Belle Sullins 10

            AKA: Nora Belle (Sullins) Utley
           Born: 30 Mar 1901 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Sep 1991 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Roy Utley (1898-1985) 10
           Marr: 16 Mar 1920 - Hobart, Kiowa Co., OK, , ,



2 F Mary Ellen Sullins 10

            AKA: Mary Ellen (Sullins) Borger, Mary Ellen (Sullins) (Borger) Reeder
           Born: 27 Jul 1902 - Port, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 May 1992 - Cordell, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
         Buried: 25 May 1992 - Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City, Beckham Co., OK, , ,
         Spouse: Ray Borger (1902-1955) 10
           Marr: 15 Oct 1926 - Shamrock, Wheeler Co., Texas, , ,
         Spouse: Albert Fred Reeder (1895-1982) 10
           Marr: 21 Jul 1965 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,



3 M George Cecil Sullins 10

           Born: 1 May 1904 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Sep 1906 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 



4 F Abbie Sullins 10

            AKA: Abbie (Sullins) Preskitt
           Born: 30 Nov 1906 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Sep 1994 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: Sep 1994 - Fairview Cemetery, Cordell, , OK, , ,
         Spouse: Paul Kruger Preskitt (1901-1993) 10
           Marr: 9 Jul 1924 - Sayre, Beckham Co., OK, , ,



5 M Jesse Clifton Sullins 10

           Born: 22 Jun 1908 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jul 1973 - Springtown, Parker Co., Texas, , ,
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Leona B. Anderson (living)



6 F Lola May Sullins 10

            AKA: Lola May (Sullins) (Davis) Brown, Lola May (Sullins) Davis
           Born: 3 Sep 1910 - Port, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Nov 1969 - Midland, , Texas, , ,
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Floyd Davis (living)
         Spouse: Grady Brown (living)



7 M Loy Ray Sullins 10

           Born: 3 Sep 1910 - Port, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Sep 1988 - Cordell, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Cleo Elizabeth Ellwanger (1911-1993) 10
           Marr: 18 Aug 1930 - Hobart, Kiowa Co., Oklahoma, , ,



8 M Claud Sullins 10

           Born: 25 Aug 1912 - Port, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Aug 1915 - Port, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 



9 F Alice Eunice Sullins (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Forrest Franklin Hughes (living)



10 M Walter Francis Sullins 10

           Born: 17 Jul 1916 - Port, Washita Co., Oklahoma, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Mar 1988 - Oklahoma City, , Oklahoma, , ,
         Buried: 4 Mar 1988 - South Burns Cemetery, , Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Spouse: Genevive Beatrice Mills (living)
         Spouse: Beatrice Music (living)



11 M Joel Elmer Sullins (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Juanita Uptergrove (living)



12 F Geneva Ruth Sullins (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Seddie Earl Ligon (1915-1985) 10
           Marr: 30 May 1940 - Pecos, Reeves Co., Texas, , ,




General Notes (Husband)

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997

In the County Court in and for Washita County, Oklahoma, In the Matter of the Estate of Jesse W. SULLINS, Deceased, No. P-2136 Final Decree Now, on this 15th day of June, 1949, this cause came on for hearing upon the Final Account, Petition for Determination of Heirs, Distribution and Discharge of Eliza F. SULLINS, Executrix of said Estate, said Executrix appearing in person and by her attorneys, Jones & Wesner, and it first being made to appear to the satisfaction of the Court that notice of this hearing has been given as required by law and the order of the Court, the court proceeds to a hearing thereon. After hearing the testimony of witnesses sworn and examined in open court and being fully advised in the premises, the Court finds that said Executrix has received the sum of $4684.58 and that she has expended, in behalf of said estate $5675.19 and that the amount paid out over and above the income was individual money of the Executrix, to which she specifically waives her right for reimbursement. The Court Further Finds, Orders, Adjudges and Determines that said Final Account is in all things correct and should be and the same is hereby allowed, approved and settled. The Court Further Finds that due legal notice to creditors to present their claims against said estate has been given as required by law and that no claims have been presented or allowed and that all the debts owing by said estate, including the expenses of the last sickness, funeral expenses, inheritances tax, income taxes and all other taxes of every nature, and costs of every nature, have been paid and that said estate is in a condition to be closed. The Court Further Finds that said Testator at the time of his death was the owner of the following described real estate, situate in Washita County, Oklahoma, to-wit: The Northeast Quarter of Section 7, Township 9 North, of Range 20, W.I.M; The West Half of the Southeast Quarter and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 9 North, of Range 20, W.I.M.; The Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 9, Township 9 North, of Range 20, W.I.M.; The Northeast Quarter of Section 30, Township 9 North, of Range 20, W.I.M.; that the testator owned all of the above described real estate in the name of J. W. SULLINS, except the West Half of the Southeast quarter and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 9 North, of Range 20, W.I.M.; which he owned in the name of Jesse W. SULLINS; that testator also owned, prior to the time of his death, a joint tenancy with his wife, Eliza F. SULLINS, the following describe real estate, situate in Washita County, Oklahoma, to-wit: Lots 5, 6 and 7 in Block 1, Boyd's Addition to the City of New Cordell in the name of J. W. SULLINS, the Court Finds, Orders, Adjudges, Decrees and Determines that J. W. SULLINS and Jesse W. SULLINS refers to one and the same identical person. The Court Further Finds, Orders, Adjudges and Decrees that the following named persons are the sole and only heirs at law of said testator: Eliza F. SULLINS, surviving wife, Nora UTLEY, a daughter, Ellen BORGER, a daughter, Abbie PRESKITT, a daughter, Jesse SULLINS, a son, Ray SULLINS, a son, May Davis, nee SULLINS, a daughter, Alice Hughes, nee SULLINS, a daughter, Walter SULLINS, a son, Joel SULLINS, a son, and Ruth LIGON, nee SULLINS, a daughter. And Now coming on to distribute the property, both real and personal, owned by said testator at the time of his death, according to the terms and provisions of his Last Will and Testament admitted to probate herein, the Court finds that said testator bequeathed to his wife, Eliza F. SULLINS, all of the personal property, and it Is Therefore, Ordered, Adjudged And Decreed by the Court that said personal property be, and the same is hereby distributed to the said Eliza F. SULLINS as her absolute property. It Is Further Ordered, Adjudged and Decreed by the Court that pursuant to the terms of said Will, all of the above described real estate, except Lots 5, 6, and 7 in Block 1, in Boyd's Addition to the City of New Cordell, Oklahoma, be, and the same is hereby transferred, vested and distributed to the said Eliza F. SULLINS for and during her natural life and that upon the death of the said Eliza F. SULLINS said real estate be, and the same is hereby transferred, vested and distributed to the following named persons, to-wit: Nora UTLEY, Ellen BORGER, Jesse SULLINS, Abbie PRESKITT, Ray SULLINS, May DAVIS, Alice HUGHES, Walter SULLINS, Joel SULLINS, and Ruth LIGON, in equal shares of an undivided 1/10 interest each. The Court Further Finds that said Executrix has faithfully discharged the duties of her trust and should be and she is hereby discharged from further liability. (SEAL) County Judge


General Notes (Wife)

From a Custer County, OK, newspaper article in 1979: When the prize for oldest pioneer at this weekend's annual Cheyenne-Arapaho Celebration in Cordell, Fred GREER may be wondering what it takes to win. Mr. GREER, who's scheduled to celebrate his 100th birthday this year, would be an easy winner at most gatherings. Not this one, which celebrates the Apr. 19, 1892, homesteader runs into Cheyenne and Arapaho country. More than likely, "oldest pioneer" honors will go to Mrs. J. W. SULLINS, who was 101 on Dec. 31, 1978. Mrs. SULLINS came to Washita County -- it was then just Indian Territory -- as a 12-year-old girl in 1889, three years before the events which are being celebrated this weekend. Both she and Mr. GREER are residents of this year's host community, Cordell. She lives in an apartment at the rear of a daughter's home while he maintains his own apartment. Still spry of mind and spirit, Mrs. SULLINS remembers well her introduction to "the Territory." Leaving Santo, Tex. (approximately 65 miles northwest of Fort Worth, on Dec. 27, 1888, she and her mother, 15-year-old brother George, a sister-in-law, and the latter's infant child 'landed' at what eventually became the town of Cloud Chief on Feb. 14, 1889. Her father, Jim BROUGHTON, and two other brothers, Wallace and Milt (Wallace was the married one), had come on ahead to search out the land. "We had a nice house in Texas," Mrs. SULLINS remembered, explaining that her father and brothers came up first to see what the country was like. When they found it agreeable, her father sent back word for his wife to sell the house and bring the other children on up. They did, traveling with some friends, Mr. and Mrs. DONAHUE, and their two children, also making the move to Indian Territory. Each family had its own wagon, with her brother driving theirs. It was pulled by two yoke of oxen, with a couple of milk cows in tow and some chickens in a coop providing fresh eggs. Mrs. SULLINS recalls that when they reached Cloud Chief, a man came out and asked them what their name was. "Your husband just left here with tears in his eyes," he told them when he found out their name was BROUGHTON. The reason; their long delay in reaching their destination, with no means of getting word to Mr. BROUGHTON concerning their whereabouts, had left him fearful that harm had befallen them along the way. "We did fine till we got over into the Territory," Mrs. SULLINS remarked. Actually, though, their troubles had started as they were crossing the Red River from Texas. "One of our oxen came unyoked in the middle of the river," she recalled. "But Mr. DONAHUE was so nice. He waded into that water up to his waist, with ice floating all around. We just knew he was going to get sick, but he didn't. Once into the Territory, their troubles really began. "We like to have froze," Mrs. SULLINS recalled. "We had to lay over at one place for three days. The snow was so bad we couldn't do anything, but we milked our cows and had fresh milk to drink." Another time they got lost, traveling for three days and winding up back in the same spot each night. "Finally we asked some folks who lived around there if they could tell us how to find the road to Fort Sill. The man told us to follow him. We did, and afterwards my mother tried to pay him. But he wouldn't take anything. íLady,' he said, íyou're not the only ones who've gotten lost. It happens all the time.'" Life on the frontier was a far cry from what it is today; in fact, it was a far cry from the life they'd lived in Texas. "There weren't any Cordells, Mountain Views or Elk Citys," said Mrs. SULLINS. "There were just a few little old dugouts at Rocky covered with ducking. "In the winter we'd go to church in a dugout, and in the summer under a brush arbor. We went to school the same way." The family settled six miles east of Rocky on a place staked out by Mr. BROUGHTON and the older boys. They named it Odessa, after a community in Texas, and at age 17, Mrs. SULLINS became the assistant postmaster. "My brothers wanted to come for the run (an earlier one in another part of the state), but Papa told them we'd get just as good a land if we waited till after the run." And since they already had land, there was no need for them to participate in the Run of '92 either, into Cheyenne and Arapaho country. In fact, Mrs. SULLINS recalls nothing about it. "They didn't have communication then like we do today," her daughter, Mrs. Fred REEDER, pointed out. On Dec. 11, 1895, just 20 days before her 18th birthday, Miss BROUGHTON was married to another Texan who had made his way north, 26-year-old Jess SULLINS. It was a union which was to last 52 years and produce 12 children -- six boys and six girls, including one set of twins. "He was a good one," Mrs. SULLINS said of her late husband. "He's been dead 30 years last June." After their marriage the couple moved to a quarter section 20 miles west of Cordell, along what is now the Washita-Beckham county line. It was land Mr. SULLINS had staked out before, and with the help of his bride's brothers he built a "honeymoon cottage"--another dugout. They moved onto the place Jan. 11, 1896. "I had never been there before," Mrs. SULLINS said, remembering a trick her new husband and one of her brothers played on her. "There was deep snow on the ground, and they told me to go on the north side of some cottonwood trees to get a bucket of snow for water. They said the snow was better there. "I ran down there and fell into a ditch filled with snow up to my waist. They knowed I'd run into the ditch, and when I looked up they were standing on the wagon, waving their hats and hollering and laughing." Mrs. SULLINS remembers well how the family graduated from dirt sleeping quarters to wood. Several of the children usually slept on trundle beds, and one morning they awoke to find a snake's skin laying on the bed where three of them had been sleeping. During the night the snake had crossed the bed and shed its skin. "My husband told me, 'We're not going to do that anymore,'" Mrs. SULLINS said. "He went and bought some lumber and three or four of the neighbors came over and helped him put up a side room." The room was primarily for sleeping, designed so snakes couldn't penetrate the wood walls as that one had the dirt walls. During the day, when they were awake, the family continued to use primarily the dirt-walled portion of the house. Eventually, through shrewd trading and purchases, Mr. SULLINS accumulated 720 acres of land. His widow remembers that 160 of it came in a trade for "eight or ten head of cows and calves (four or five pair) and about six or eight mule colts." That particular tract of land, incidentally, is still in the family. Indians posed no particular problem, Mrs. SULLINS recalls, although she does have one rather grisly tale to tell about Big Tree, who had become civilized and converted to Christianity by the time she got to know him. "Old Big Tree was a bugger," she said, "not mean, just big. He'd get up and preach and tell how he used to pitch little babies up and catch 'em on his knife. "Oh, how it hurts my heart now," he'd say. "It was tough life for a few years, but it was a happy life," Mrs. SULLINS said in summing up her days on one of America's last frontiers. Incidentally, she plans to be around for several more Cheyenne-Arapaho celebrations, and if heredity has anything to with it she very well could. Her grandfather lived to be 106.

"Some Of My Early Day Experiences In Western Oklahoma," by Mrs. J. W. SULLINS: I moved with my parents from Santo, Texas in Palo Pinto County in 1889 and settled on a farm near Cloud Chief, O. T. My father kept the little country post office by the name of Odessa, near Cloud Chief. I helped my father in the post office and was a close assistant of his, as I was the youngest child of a family of seven children. We lived there until December 11, 1895, when I became the bride of the most handsome man on earth, according to my opinion, J. W. SULLINS. He had filed on a farm 12 miles southeast of Elk City's present location (at that time the town was known as Bush, O. T.). He immediately went to work digging a dug-out and "proving up" on our farm and in late winter we moved into our first little home. The prairies were all covered with tall brown grass with just a few wagon trails going across country and only a very few dug-outs dotted about every ten to fifteen miles. Our little home was a little heaven to us, in spite of the fact that the walls and floors were dirt. We put straw on the floors and covered the straw with a wagon sheet. Old sheets covered the dirt walls. Our furniture was very crude, and our food very plain, but it was good and we were happy. We had no newspaper or any type of outside communications. For music, my husband played "Turkey in the Straw" on the old violin, or "Are You From Dixie" on a French harp. He went about his work whistling all kind of pretty tunes. He was a great whistler. He continued to whistle while he worked as long as he lived. In nice weather, our little home was spic and span, but sometimes after a big rain, we would step out of bed and the water would be six inches deep on our nice wagon sheet carpet and our babies trundle bed would be wet, as the gophers would dig holes and allow the water to run in. These trundle beds were low on the floor and when not in use were pushed back under our one big bed. In those days, we thought nothing about three or four children sleeping in one bed. This dug-out was two very small rooms, about 10 x 12 feet. Just before our fourth child was born, we got up one morning and found a rattle snake shed in the trundle bed. My husband didn't whistle that day and that night he didn't play the fiddle. We were busy trying to figure out a way to move. So we started at once to build a house nearby, hauling lumber from El Reno. This house consisted of one large room, 14 x 16 feet, and a small side room on the back. We were really living it up in our new home, except when the wind came from the south the stove in the side room would smoke us out. Fuel was a problem in those days. We had very little coal. We burned cow chips, known as "Kansas Coal" or "Grassolene". We would just take big toe sacks and go out on the prairie and pick up the chips, or anything else we could find that might burn. On wash days in the summer, we would carry our cloths about one-fourth mile to the head of a small creek where there was a spring. We would build a fire under a big black pot and fill it with spring water, where we would wash on a board and boil our cloths in the pot and spread them out on the tall grass to dry while the children played nearby. This was a full day's job and were lucky if we got back to the house with our clean cloths in time to watch the beautiful sunset, which was one of our most pleasant times together. As the years passed, other children were born. Our land was plowed and fences built, our neighbors were struggling the same as we. All had big families. We had 12 living children, six girls and six boys. Neighbors loved each other and many times on a cold winter day, our husbands would hitch the team to the wagon and we would take our families and spend the day with each other. The men would build fence or butcher hogs or whatever was needed most, while the mothers would sew, piece quilts or whatever we had to do while 10 or 15 children played about the small house. Again our meals were very plain, consisting of maybe a pot of beans, or a big stew with very little meat. We had our own milk and butter and pork in small amounts, but there were no fancy dishes we have today. One cold, early spring day, we were having a severe sand storm. We were out of groceries and only one dime was in the house. My husband came in and said "Mother, I see someone coming up the trail, riding a horse and leading one and I'm going to make a horse trade and bring in some bacon." Sure enough, the man came on down and my husband asked him in for coffee, the coffee pot was usually on and we always invited strangers to eat, if it was meal time. They got to talking trade and before long they traded and the man gave us $10 to boot. That bought groceries to last several days. Our children were all taught to work; we worked together and enjoyed it. We still own our farm we filed on, plus three other farms nearby. We lived on the same homestead until we were forced to retire in 1944 due to my husband's health. I have many fond memories of the dear old home and all the hardships, plus many more joys and many incidents that bring laughs even now. One of the most exciting experiences of the early days comes to mind. Late one night, we were having an electrical storm. We heard a wagon coming somewhere in the distance. Finally it drew near and stopped. My husband took the lantern and went out to meet the stranger. This man was inquiring the way to Gotebo. We invited him to spend the night as it was late and storming. He accepted and was most appreciative of our hospitality, but I was young and the thought of it all kept me awake all night. We always took our children to Sunday School. In winter in the early days we attended services in a dug-out, in summer under a brush arbor. I thank God every day for the blessings he has given me and for our home and family and many dear friends throughout the past 75 years. Our ten living children are Nora SULLINS UTLEY, Ellen SULLINS REEDER, Abbie SULLINS PRESKITT, Jess SULLINS, Maye SULLINS BROWN, Ray SULLINS, Alice SULLINS HUGHES, Walter SULLINS, Joel SULLINS and Ruth SULLINS LIGON.


General Notes for Child Nora Belle Sullins

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997


General Notes for Child Mary Ellen Sullins

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997


General Notes for Child Abbie Sullins

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997

Beckham Co., OK, Marriage Book 7, p. 157


General Notes for Child Jesse Clifton Sullins

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997


General Notes for Child Walter Francis Sullins

Info from Don SULLINS, Weatherford, OK. Date:13 JAN 1997

Story about Walter Francis SULLINS, by his son Don SULLINS: I guess the first thing I ever remember about Dad was when I was about four years old, him teaching me how to drive. We lived on the old home place, two miles south of Highway 41 (later changed to 152) on the Beckham/Washita County line and about a half mile back east. There were 320 acres on the home place, with 115 acres in wheat and 205 acres of pasture. Dad had a pull type combine and was cutting wheat in the field just north of the house. He took me with him one day and told me I would drive the truck. He said that when he filled the bin on the combine with wheat, he would wave his hat for me to bring the truck, so he could dump the wheat. I don't remember what kind of truck it was, but I remember very vividly that the starter was on the floorboard. Dad put a box in the seat for me to set on. The old truck had a throttle on it, as most vehicles in those days had. He placed the transmission in 1st gear (Granny) and pulled the throttle out about a third of the way. He had me practice a couple of times. I would turn the key on and get down in the floorboard and have to use both hands to engage the starter. I would have to hold it down until the old truck started, and then climb up in the seat and then onto the box and aim in the direction of where Dad was at, and then when getting to where he was at, turning the key off to stop. Guess I made it alright a time or two, but later in the day I fell asleep and didn't see him waving for me to come. I do remember that was quite an experience for this little boy. *** I can remember Dad being a very hard worker. As I got older, I can remember him taking care of the farming and the cattle we had and then going to Colorado to harvest wheat. He would be gone for several months, and then return home and get the ground ready for the next year's crop. As my brother Jack and I got older, we would do the plowing and the chores around the farm while Dad was gone on wheat harvest. *** I don't think there ever was a man who loved cattle and horses, like Dad did. And it seemed as he grew older, that love multiplied. Dad was a very knowledgeable man when it come to cattle and horses. I honestly believe that when the cattle or horses were sick he could feel their pain also. He enjoyed helping other people with their livestock and horses. In fact people would call him for advice. I believe Dad had more knowledge than most vets, but just didn't have the book knowledge. *** I have to relate a story here, that for many years I kept to myself. In fact, I didn't start talking about it until after Dad revealed the story himself. We had several cattle on the pasture at the east place, and would have to check on them almost on a daily basis. We had to check that they had plenty of water and also check that none had gotten out. Dad would usually take me with him to check them. Well, there was this one Holstein heifer who was always out ever time we went to check on them. Dad and I have run many a mile chasing her, to get her back in the pasture. She was a jumper; could jump a fence like a deer. One day we went to check, and sure enough she was over in the neighbor's pasture. When we got out of the pickup, Dad grabbed an old double barrel shotgun and we climbed over the fence and started trying to get her back in. As always, she would just run up and down the fence line, and wouldn't jump back over into our pasture. We were give out from chasing her, and I guess she knew it. Anyway, she started to jump the fence, and about the time she reached maximum height, Dad swung that old shotgun up and pulled both triggers. WOW! She come down like something had hit her from above. The buckshot had caught her right behind the left front shoulder blade. We thought she was dead. Dad said "Well, guess I killed her". She wasn't dead, just badly wounded. Dad cleaned the buckshot out of her and doctored her up. Finally, she got up and limped off. Dad said she would probably die before the next morning. He said we would come back and drag her body off early the next morning. When we got in the pickup, Dad said, "Son, don't you breathe a word of this to anyone". I told him I wouldn't, and I didn't. I wouldn't even tell my brother, Jack. We went back the next morning to check, and to our surprise, the heifer wasn't dead. She was really stiff and couldn't hardly move, but she was alive. Dad doctored her for several days, and she eventually stopped limping. I guess Dad made a believer out of her, as she never got out another time, as long as we had her. *** As I said before, Dad was a hard worker, and provided for his family very well. We always had plenty to eat, and nice clothes to wear to school. I can remember him doing farming during the day, and roughnecking in the western Oklahoma oil fields at night. I can remember Mother taking us to the oil rigs sometimes to see him. He also worked at the livestock sale in Elk City on Saturdays. Mother would always take us to Elk on Saturdays, and we would go to the sale barn and see Dad, and Mother would take us to a movie. Those days are still very vivid to me. It seems like only yesterday, for so many years to have passed. *** Dad was a very strong willed man (hard headed). (I have found in my research, that most of the Sullins men and women, were very strong willed). Dad was also a very strict man. You were taught that you didn't talk back or be disrespectful. If you were, or looked like you were even thinking about it, you suffered the consequences. I remember Dad being a member and president of the Highway High School, School Board for many years. He did not want the school staff to show any partiality to his children. In fact, he told them if his children disobeyed the rules, they were to be punished, just like the other children. Dad and Mother taught us the right things, but later in life I didn't always abide by those things. They taught us children right from wrong. *** I have many happy and fond memories of Dad during my growing up years. I remember very well him teaching me how to drive, ride a horse, saddle a horse, drive cattle, ride a bucking calf, operate a combine, sow wheat, to tell when wheat was ready for harvest, plant cotton, plow, how to tell time on a clock (a white, 25 lb. bag of flour, with a clock on it, in the kitchen at the old homeplace). *** When I was 16 Dad started taking me on wheat harvest with him. We would start down around Frederick, Oklahoma, and work our way north, all the way to South Dakota. Usually by the time we arrived there it was nearly time for school to start back, and Mother would come pick us up and take us back home in time to get back in school. I really enjoyed that time of my life, as there were several of the other boys my age, and were also school buddies. One year while we at Greensburg, Kansas, we had a wet spell and couldn't cut wheat for a few days. A guy wanted to hire one of Dad's trucks to haul a load of furniture to Hutchinson, Kansas. Dad sent me and Gary ROACH to haul the furniture. When we arrived in Hutchinson, we somehow got separated from the guy we were following, and we got lost. I phoned Dad back in Greensburg, and he was really upset at the guy that had hired us. He told me to untie the furniture and raise the hoist and dump the furniture out on the street and come on back to Greensburg. Needless to say I didn't do that, as about the time I hung up from talking to Dad, the guy found us. That was quite an experience for Gary and I. *** Dad loved his family very much, although you wouldn't think so at times. Sometimes I wonder how Mother put up with him for all those years. He would not allow anyone to wrong his family, or they would have to suffer the consequences. There wasn't anything he wouldn't do within his power for us. I remember a time about 12 years ago, I was going through a really bad time in my life, and Dad got on an airplane and flew to Kentucky where I was living at the time and spent a few days with me. Dad and Mother were always there when I needed them most, and for that I will always be grateful. *** For about 20 years or so, Dad worked for Mike JOHNSON. He ran the feed lot operation. Mike would tell you in no uncertain terms that if anyone else besides Dad had been running the operation, he would have had to go out of business. After Mike died, Dad started buying cattle and working for my sister Judy and her husband, Jimmy MUSICK. Dad just wouldn't do anything else, he loved being around cattle too much. I have been home in the winter time, and he would be sick, but he would still go out in the cold, get on a horse and work cattle. *** A few years ago a Mutual Broadcasting Company announcer, Ross SIMPSON, did an interview about the American Cowboy, and he interviewed Dad and one of the guys that worked with him. Dad said in one part of the tape, that he and Bobby were out riding in the pasture one day, checking cattle, and he turned to Bobby and said, "If Heaven is like this, I sure want to go there." He also used an old cowboy saying that "When he died, he wanted to die with his boots on." Well, sadly to say he didn't get that wish, as he passed on to a greater life, in a hospital bed in Oklahoma City, OK., on 1 March 1988. I was unable to be at his side when he passed away or at his funeral, and that still hurts to this day, however, I am grateful that exactly one week before he passed away, I was blessed with the opportunity to put my arms around him, and give him a hug and kiss, and tell him that I loved him. I knew when I walked out of that hospital room, that I would never see him again. I didn't return home for another two years, mainly because I didn't want to face the reality that he wouldn't be there. It hurts, but it is suppose to. I'm just grateful that I had the time with him that I did, and I know that in the beyond we will be together again. I miss him very much. I have his last pair of boots, which I will cherish forever.


Richard Marshall and Ellen Broughton



Husband Richard Marshall 4

           Born: 1911
     Christened: 
           Died: 1971
         Buried: 


         Father: Randall Davis Marshall (1880-1941) 4
         Mother: Ivah Emma Coon (1880-1931) 4


       Marriage: 




Wife Ellen Broughton 4

           Born: 1913
     Christened: 
           Died: 1999
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Janet Sue Marshall (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Anton Gerald Erickson (living)





Evelyn Delves Broughton and Elizabeth Florence Marion Cholmondeley



Husband Evelyn Delves Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

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       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Florence Marion Cholmondeley 11

           Born: 26 Dec 1925
     Christened: 
           Died: 1988
         Buried: 


         Father: Thomas Pitt Hamilton Cholmondeley (1900-1979) 11
         Mother: Phyllis Anne Montagu-Douglas-Scott (1904-1978) 11



   Other Spouse: Peter Barrington



Henry Broughton and Marinda Grubb



Husband Henry Broughton

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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       Marriage: 12 Jul 1894 - Clay County, Kentucky 12




Wife Marinda Grubb

           Born: 1880 - Clay County, Kentucky 13
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Samuel (S.O. Isaac 18220 Grubb (1848-Abt 1905)
         Mother: Esther Mills (1847-1905)





James C. (Jim) Broughton and Nancy Clark



Husband James C. (Jim) Broughton 10

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       Marriage: 




Wife Nancy Clark 10

            AKA: Nancy (Clark) Broughton
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Children
1 F Elizabeth Frances (Eliza) Broughton 10

            AKA: Eliza (Broughton) Sullins
           Born: 31 Dec 1877 - Santo, Palo Pinto Co., TX, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 May 1979 - Cordell, Washita Co., OK, , ,
         Buried: 20 May 1979 - Eural Cemetery, , Beckham Co., OK, , ,
         Spouse: Jessie W. Sullins (1873-1948) 10
           Marr: 11 Dec 1895 - Washita Co., Oklahoma Territory, , ,




General Notes for Child Elizabeth Frances (Eliza) Broughton

From a Custer County, OK, newspaper article in 1979: When the prize for oldest pioneer at this weekend's annual Cheyenne-Arapaho Celebration in Cordell, Fred GREER may be wondering what it takes to win. Mr. GREER, who's scheduled to celebrate his 100th birthday this year, would be an easy winner at most gatherings. Not this one, which celebrates the Apr. 19, 1892, homesteader runs into Cheyenne and Arapaho country. More than likely, "oldest pioneer" honors will go to Mrs. J. W. SULLINS, who was 101 on Dec. 31, 1978. Mrs. SULLINS came to Washita County -- it was then just Indian Territory -- as a 12-year-old girl in 1889, three years before the events which are being celebrated this weekend. Both she and Mr. GREER are residents of this year's host community, Cordell. She lives in an apartment at the rear of a daughter's home while he maintains his own apartment. Still spry of mind and spirit, Mrs. SULLINS remembers well her introduction to "the Territory." Leaving Santo, Tex. (approximately 65 miles northwest of Fort Worth, on Dec. 27, 1888, she and her mother, 15-year-old brother George, a sister-in-law, and the latter's infant child 'landed' at what eventually became the town of Cloud Chief on Feb. 14, 1889. Her father, Jim BROUGHTON, and two other brothers, Wallace and Milt (Wallace was the married one), had come on ahead to search out the land. "We had a nice house in Texas," Mrs. SULLINS remembered, explaining that her father and brothers came up first to see what the country was like. When they found it agreeable, her father sent back word for his wife to sell the house and bring the other children on up. They did, traveling with some friends, Mr. and Mrs. DONAHUE, and their two children, also making the move to Indian Territory. Each family had its own wagon, with her brother driving theirs. It was pulled by two yoke of oxen, with a couple of milk cows in tow and some chickens in a coop providing fresh eggs. Mrs. SULLINS recalls that when they reached Cloud Chief, a man came out and asked them what their name was. "Your husband just left here with tears in his eyes," he told them when he found out their name was BROUGHTON. The reason; their long delay in reaching their destination, with no means of getting word to Mr. BROUGHTON concerning their whereabouts, had left him fearful that harm had befallen them along the way. "We did fine till we got over into the Territory," Mrs. SULLINS remarked. Actually, though, their troubles had started as they were crossing the Red River from Texas. "One of our oxen came unyoked in the middle of the river," she recalled. "But Mr. DONAHUE was so nice. He waded into that water up to his waist, with ice floating all around. We just knew he was going to get sick, but he didn't. Once into the Territory, their troubles really began. "We like to have froze," Mrs. SULLINS recalled. "We had to lay over at one place for three days. The snow was so bad we couldn't do anything, but we milked our cows and had fresh milk to drink." Another time they got lost, traveling for three days and winding up back in the same spot each night. "Finally we asked some folks who lived around there if they could tell us how to find the road to Fort Sill. The man told us to follow him. We did, and afterwards my mother tried to pay him. But he wouldn't take anything. íLady,' he said, íyou're not the only ones who've gotten lost. It happens all the time.'" Life on the frontier was a far cry from what it is today; in fact, it was a far cry from the life they'd lived in Texas. "There weren't any Cordells, Mountain Views or Elk Citys," said Mrs. SULLINS. "There were just a few little old dugouts at Rocky covered with ducking. "In the winter we'd go to church in a dugout, and in the summer under a brush arbor. We went to school the same way." The family settled six miles east of Rocky on a place staked out by Mr. BROUGHTON and the older boys. They named it Odessa, after a community in Texas, and at age 17, Mrs. SULLINS became the assistant postmaster. "My brothers wanted to come for the run (an earlier one in another part of the state), but Papa told them we'd get just as good a land if we waited till after the run." And since they already had land, there was no need for them to participate in the Run of '92 either, into Cheyenne and Arapaho country. In fact, Mrs. SULLINS recalls nothing about it. "They didn't have communication then like we do today," her daughter, Mrs. Fred REEDER, pointed out. On Dec. 11, 1895, just 20 days before her 18th birthday, Miss BROUGHTON was married to another Texan who had made his way north, 26-year-old Jess SULLINS. It was a union which was to last 52 years and produce 12 children -- six boys and six girls, including one set of twins. "He was a good one," Mrs. SULLINS said of her late husband. "He's been dead 30 years last June." After their marriage the couple moved to a quarter section 20 miles west of Cordell, along what is now the Washita-Beckham county line. It was land Mr. SULLINS had staked out before, and with the help of his bride's brothers he built a "honeymoon cottage"--another dugout. They moved onto the place Jan. 11, 1896. "I had never been there before," Mrs. SULLINS said, remembering a trick her new husband and one of her brothers played on her. "There was deep snow on the ground, and they told me to go on the north side of some cottonwood trees to get a bucket of snow for water. They said the snow was better there. "I ran down there and fell into a ditch filled with snow up to my waist. They knowed I'd run into the ditch, and when I looked up they were standing on the wagon, waving their hats and hollering and laughing." Mrs. SULLINS remembers well how the family graduated from dirt sleeping quarters to wood. Several of the children usually slept on trundle beds, and one morning they awoke to find a snake's skin laying on the bed where three of them had been sleeping. During the night the snake had crossed the bed and shed its skin. "My husband told me, 'We're not going to do that anymore,'" Mrs. SULLINS said. "He went and bought some lumber and three or four of the neighbors came over and helped him put up a side room." The room was primarily for sleeping, designed so snakes couldn't penetrate the wood walls as that one had the dirt walls. During the day, when they were awake, the family continued to use primarily the dirt-walled portion of the house. Eventually, through shrewd trading and purchases, Mr. SULLINS accumulated 720 acres of land. His widow remembers that 160 of it came in a trade for "eight or ten head of cows and calves (four or five pair) and about six or eight mule colts." That particular tract of land, incidentally, is still in the family. Indians posed no particular problem, Mrs. SULLINS recalls, although she does have one rather grisly tale to tell about Big Tree, who had become civilized and converted to Christianity by the time she got to know him. "Old Big Tree was a bugger," she said, "not mean, just big. He'd get up and preach and tell how he used to pitch little babies up and catch 'em on his knife. "Oh, how it hurts my heart now," he'd say. "It was tough life for a few years, but it was a happy life," Mrs. SULLINS said in summing up her days on one of America's last frontiers. Incidentally, she plans to be around for several more Cheyenne-Arapaho celebrations, and if heredity has anything to with it she very well could. Her grandfather lived to be 106.

"Some Of My Early Day Experiences In Western Oklahoma," by Mrs. J. W. SULLINS: I moved with my parents from Santo, Texas in Palo Pinto County in 1889 and settled on a farm near Cloud Chief, O. T. My father kept the little country post office by the name of Odessa, near Cloud Chief. I helped my father in the post office and was a close assistant of his, as I was the youngest child of a family of seven children. We lived there until December 11, 1895, when I became the bride of the most handsome man on earth, according to my opinion, J. W. SULLINS. He had filed on a farm 12 miles southeast of Elk City's present location (at that time the town was known as Bush, O. T.). He immediately went to work digging a dug-out and "proving up" on our farm and in late winter we moved into our first little home. The prairies were all covered with tall brown grass with just a few wagon trails going across country and only a very few dug-outs dotted about every ten to fifteen miles. Our little home was a little heaven to us, in spite of the fact that the walls and floors were dirt. We put straw on the floors and covered the straw with a wagon sheet. Old sheets covered the dirt walls. Our furniture was very crude, and our food very plain, but it was good and we were happy. We had no newspaper or any type of outside communications. For music, my husband played "Turkey in the Straw" on the old violin, or "Are You From Dixie" on a French harp. He went about his work whistling all kind of pretty tunes. He was a great whistler. He continued to whistle while he worked as long as he lived. In nice weather, our little home was spic and span, but sometimes after a big rain, we would step out of bed and the water would be six inches deep on our nice wagon sheet carpet and our babies trundle bed would be wet, as the gophers would dig holes and allow the water to run in. These trundle beds were low on the floor and when not in use were pushed back under our one big bed. In those days, we thought nothing about three or four children sleeping in one bed. This dug-out was two very small rooms, about 10 x 12 feet. Just before our fourth child was born, we got up one morning and found a rattle snake shed in the trundle bed. My husband didn't whistle that day and that night he didn't play the fiddle. We were busy trying to figure out a way to move. So we started at once to build a house nearby, hauling lumber from El Reno. This house consisted of one large room, 14 x 16 feet, and a small side room on the back. We were really living it up in our new home, except when the wind came from the south the stove in the side room would smoke us out. Fuel was a problem in those days. We had very little coal. We burned cow chips, known as "Kansas Coal" or "Grassolene". We would just take big toe sacks and go out on the prairie and pick up the chips, or anything else we could find that might burn. On wash days in the summer, we would carry our cloths about one-fourth mile to the head of a small creek where there was a spring. We would build a fire under a big black pot and fill it with spring water, where we would wash on a board and boil our cloths in the pot and spread them out on the tall grass to dry while the children played nearby. This was a full day's job and were lucky if we got back to the house with our clean cloths in time to watch the beautiful sunset, which was one of our most pleasant times together. As the years passed, other children were born. Our land was plowed and fences built, our neighbors were struggling the same as we. All had big families. We had 12 living children, six girls and six boys. Neighbors loved each other and many times on a cold winter day, our husbands would hitch the team to the wagon and we would take our families and spend the day with each other. The men would build fence or butcher hogs or whatever was needed most, while the mothers would sew, piece quilts or whatever we had to do while 10 or 15 children played about the small house. Again our meals were very plain, consisting of maybe a pot of beans, or a big stew with very little meat. We had our own milk and butter and pork in small amounts, but there were no fancy dishes we have today. One cold, early spring day, we were having a severe sand storm. We were out of groceries and only one dime was in the house. My husband came in and said "Mother, I see someone coming up the trail, riding a horse and leading one and I'm going to make a horse trade and bring in some bacon." Sure enough, the man came on down and my husband asked him in for coffee, the coffee pot was usually on and we always invited strangers to eat, if it was meal time. They got to talking trade and before long they traded and the man gave us $10 to boot. That bought groceries to last several days. Our children were all taught to work; we worked together and enjoyed it. We still own our farm we filed on, plus three other farms nearby. We lived on the same homestead until we were forced to retire in 1944 due to my husband's health. I have many fond memories of the dear old home and all the hardships, plus many more joys and many incidents that bring laughs even now. One of the most exciting experiences of the early days comes to mind. Late one night, we were having an electrical storm. We heard a wagon coming somewhere in the distance. Finally it drew near and stopped. My husband took the lantern and went out to meet the stranger. This man was inquiring the way to Gotebo. We invited him to spend the night as it was late and storming. He accepted and was most appreciative of our hospitality, but I was young and the thought of it all kept me awake all night. We always took our children to Sunday School. In winter in the early days we attended services in a dug-out, in summer under a brush arbor. I thank God every day for the blessings he has given me and for our home and family and many dear friends throughout the past 75 years. Our ten living children are Nora SULLINS UTLEY, Ellen SULLINS REEDER, Abbie SULLINS PRESKITT, Jess SULLINS, Maye SULLINS BROWN, Ray SULLINS, Alice SULLINS HUGHES, Walter SULLINS, Joel SULLINS and Ruth SULLINS LIGON.


Rowland Hill Sir Bart and Jane Broughton



Husband Rowland Hill Sir Bart 3 7

           Born: 
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           Died: 7 Aug 1783
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Jane Broughton 3 7

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Dec 1773
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         Father: Brian Broughton Sir Bart (      -1724) 3 7
         Mother: Elizabeth Delves (      -1745) 3 7





Children
1 M Rowland Hill Sir 2Nd Bart 3 7

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2 M John Hill Sir 3 7

           Born: 
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           Died: May 1824
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mary Chambre (      -1806) 3 7




General Notes (Husband)

1 UPDA 2 DATE 17 FEB 1726 2 PLAC Created Bart


General Notes for Child John Hill Sir

1 UPDA 2 PLAC 3rd Bart


Suceeded his elder brother


John Broughton and Elizabeth Woodruff



Husband John Broughton 14

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   Other Spouse: Elizabeth Woodruff (1652-      ) 14 - 29 Oct 1678 14




Wife Elizabeth Woodruff 14

           Born: 1665 14
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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         Father: Matthew Woodruff (1612-1682) 14
         Mother: Hannah (1620-      ) 14





John Broughton and Elizabeth Woodruff



Husband John Broughton 14

           Born: 
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       Marriage: 29 Oct 1678 14

   Other Spouse: Elizabeth Woodruff (1665-      ) 14




Wife Elizabeth Woodruff 14

           Born: Nov 1652 - Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut 14
     Christened: 2 Apr 1654 - Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut 14
           Died: 
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         Father: Matthew Woodruff (1612-1682) 14
         Mother: Hannah (1620-      ) 14





John Broughton



Husband John Broughton 3

           Born: 16 Nov 1512
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         Father: John Broughton (Bef 1489-1517) 3
         Mother: Anne Sapcote (      -1558) 3


       Marriage: 




Wife

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John Broughton and Anne Sapcote



Husband John Broughton 3

           Born: Bef 1489
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Jan 1517
         Buried:  - Toddington Church
       Marriage: 




Wife Anne Sapcote 3

           Born: 
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           Died: 14 Mar 1558
         Buried:  - Chenies Church


         Father: Guy Sapcote Sir (      -      ) 3
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Richard Jerningham Sir (      -      ) 3

   Other Spouse: John Russell (1485-1554) 3 - 1526



Children
1 F Catherine Broughton 1 3

           Born: 
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           Died: 23 Apr 1535 - Some Say Died 1531. 1
         Buried:  - Lambeth Church, Surrey
         Spouse: William Of Effingham Howard Lord (      -1572) 1
         Spouse: William Howard Lord Howard (Abt 1510-1572) 1 3 5 7
           Marr: Bef 18 Jun 1531



2 M John Broughton 3

           Born: 16 Nov 1512
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3 F Anne Broughton 3

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General Notes (Husband)

1 UPDA 2 PLAC Acceded: Toddington, Bedford


An heir of Engaine, as shown in the chart in The Complete Peerage vol.V,p80.


John C. Broughton and Polly Ann Perry



Husband John C. Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Polly Ann Perry (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: John Curtis Perry (1880-1949) 10
         Mother: Hattie Elizabeth Louisa Sullins (1891-1966) 10



   Other Spouse: Kenneth F. (Ken) Haas



Children
1 F Connie Jean Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Roger E. Demarest (living)





St. Andrew St. John 13th Baron and Louisa Broughton



Husband St. Andrew St. John 13th Baron 3 7

           Born: 
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           Died: 15 Oct 1817
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         Father: John St. John 11th Baron (      -1767) 3 7
         Mother: Susannah Louisa Simond (      -      ) 3 7


       Marriage: 




Wife Louisa Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Charles William Rouse Broughton Sir Bart.
         Mother: 





Children
1 M St. Andrew Beauchamp St. John 14th Baron (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Eleanor Hussey (living)





Wilmot Gibbes Holmes and Maria Broughton



Husband Wilmot Gibbes Holmes 4

           Born: 16 Jun 1837 - South Carolina
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           Died: 12 Sep 1903 - South Carolina
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         Father: Henry Mccall Holmes (1790-1854) 4
         Mother: Elizabeth Ford Gibbes (1808-1875) 4


       Marriage: 




Wife Maria Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

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Isaac Motte and Mary Broughton



Husband Isaac Motte 4

           Born: 8 Dec 1738 - Charleston, South Carolina
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 May 1795 - Charleston, South Carolina
         Buried:  - St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, South Carolina


         Father: Jacob Motte (1700-1770) 4
         Mother: Elizabeth Martin (1710-1757) 4


       Marriage: 18 Dec 1776

   Other Spouse: Anne Smith (1745-1772) 4 - 15 Dec 1763

   Other Spouse: Catherine Deas (Abt 1740-1776) 4 - 1776

Noted events in his life were:
• Occupation, Served In Canada & Fort Moultrie, Abt 1776

• Event 2, SC Representative To Continental Congress, 1780




Wife Mary Broughton 4

           Born: Abt 1740
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Jul 1785
         Buried: 


         Father: Alexander Broughton (Abt 1720-      ) 4
         Mother: Mary Jones (Abt 1720-      ) 4





Children
1 M Alexander Broughton Motte 4

           Born: Abt 1777
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth Motte 4

           Born: Abt 1779
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 F Charlotte Henrietta Motte 4

           Born: Abt 1780
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Isaac Motte was appointed an ensign in His Majesty's Sixti eth Royal American Regiment at the age of eighteen. He serv ed in Canada during the Seven Years War. At the outbreak o f our Revolutionary War, he was a lieutenant colonel in th e Second Regiment of Foot and was second in command at th e Battle of Fort Moultrie. He was promoted to colonel in Se ptember 1776, but resigned his commission when named to th e Privy Council.


James Laurens and Mary Broughton



Husband James Laurens 4

           Born: 1728
     Christened: 
           Died: 1784
         Buried: 


         Father: John Samuel Laurens (1696-1747) 4
         Mother: Esther Crosset (1700-1742) 4


       Marriage: Abt 1750




Wife Mary Broughton 4

           Born: Abt 1735 - Goochland, Virginia
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Broughton Laurens 4

           Born: 1753
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





William Roddie Duke and Penolope Broughton



Husband William Roddie Duke 9

           Born: 21 Apr 1823 - SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jun 1877 - Duke, AL
         Buried: 


         Father: William Duke (Abt 1793-Bef 1830) 9
         Mother: Elizabeth West (      -      ) 9


       Marriage: 




Wife Penolope Broughton 9

           Born: 9 Jun 1821
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Apr 1900 - Duke, AL
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Bailus West Duke (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M William Green Duke 9

           Born: 20 Jun 1846
     Christened: 
           Died:  - Wellington, AL
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Josephine Emma Webster (1844-1929) 9





Peter Broughton and Sarah Swinton



Husband Peter Broughton 4

           Born: Abt 1770
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Swinton 4

           Born: Abt 1774
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh Swinton (1737-1809) 4
         Mother: Susannah Hayne Splatt (1748-1822) 4





Thomas Broughton and Marianne Porcher



Husband Thomas Broughton 4

           Born: Abt 1750
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Marianne Porcher 4

           Born: Abt 1758
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Philip Porcher (1730-1800) 4
         Mother: Mary Mazyck (1734-1785) 4





Thomas Broughton and Susannah Bee Donnom



Husband Thomas Broughton 4

           Born: Abt 1760
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 1779




Wife Susannah Bee Donnom 4

           Born: Abt 1763
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: James Donnom (Abt 1720-1775) 4
         Mother: Mary Bee (1731-1765) 4





James A 'Jim' Smith and Vallery Broughton



Husband James A 'Jim' Smith (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Vallery Broughton (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Inez Smith (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: A Z Watson (1910-1959) 9





George B. Sullens and Annie Brouk



Husband George B. Sullens 10

           Born: 12 Feb 1877 - Jefferson Co., MO, , ,
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Darius Alvin (Al) Sullens (1840-1931) 10
         Mother: Julia Ann Pritchett (1856-1912) 10


       Marriage: 




Wife Annie Brouk (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

He operated an auto repair shop at Fenton, Missouri.


John Cusack and Ann Broun



Husband John Cusack 4

           Born: Abt 1740
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1780
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Ann Broun 4

           Born: Abt 1750
     Christened: 
           Died: 1803
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Broun (Abt 1715-      ) 4
         Mother: Elizabeth Thomas (Abt 1720-      ) 4



   Other Spouse: John Huger (Abt 1744-1804) 4 - 11 Jan 1785 - South Carolina





Sources


1 ROYAL92.GED Gedcom file.

2 royalfam.ged.

3 Peter Western, </pre><a href="http://www.genealogydatabase.co.uk/tngsoonad.html">http://www.genealogydatabase.co.uk/tngsoonad.html</a><pre>.

4 J. Feagin, Gedcom from J. Feagin.

5 No Title Given.

6 June Ferguson Unknown, June Ferguson's Royalty GED.

7 Edward III Decendents.

8 No Title Given, 9-10.

9 Herman Geshwind, Old Pendelton District Database - a project of the Old Pendelton District Chapter of the South Carolina Genealogica Society..

10 Michael S. Cole MD, Michael S. Cole MD (7410 Oxford Pl. Fort Smith, AR 72903-4232).

11 L. David Roper, Rousper.ged by L. David Roper.

12 Grubb.GED Ernie Grubb May 2000.

13 WFT Disk # 22;Grubb.GED Ernie Grubb May 2000.

14 af18.ged (GEDCOM file obtained from Genealogy Online, Santa Cruz, California. File "af18.ged" / http://emcee.com , obtained 1/28/96. Original author unknown.)

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