I'm Alfred Salzman of 8630 SW Scholls Ferry Rd. #133 Beaverton, OR, 97008 USA.

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Caroline Mcmillan Hagood



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Wife Caroline Mcmillan Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: David Maybank Hagood
         Mother: Elizabeth Houston McMillan





Charles Cleveland Hagood and Fay Ann Sherman



Husband Charles Cleveland Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: George Cleveland Hagood (1916-1974) 1
         Mother: Mary Louise Smith (1918-1999) 1


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Wife Fay Ann Sherman (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 M Charles Cleveland Hagood Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

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2 F Grace Ann Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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Charles Earle Hagood



Husband Charles Earle Hagood 1

           Born: 8 Jul 1864 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Sep 1889 - Greenville, SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: John H Hagood (1839-1921) 1
         Mother: Elizabeth Goodwin (1843-1891) 1


       Marriage: 




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General Notes (Husband)

"Charles E. Hagood died in Greenville last Sabbath of typhoid fever. Services were held in Greenville by Dr. J.A. Mundy and burial at Hagood Cemetery, Pickens County. Mr. Hagood left this county several years ago." Source: "Pickens Sentinel", Thursday 19 September 1889 ************************************************************************** **************************************


Clarence Bruce Hagood and Ruth Starke



Husband Clarence Bruce Hagood 1

           Born: 9 Aug 1883 - Easley, Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Feb 1933 - Easley, Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: William Millikin Hagood (1850-1927) 1
         Mother: Kate Cleveland (1852-1929) 1


       Marriage: 




Wife Ruth Starke 1

           Born: 7 Jan 1884
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Jun 1971 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: E B Starke (      -1915) 1
         Mother: 





Children
1 F Katherine Hagood 1

           Born: 4 Jan 1904 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Apr 1982
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Ryland Arwood Blakey (1900-1976) 1



2 M Albert Starke Hagood 1

           Born: Jun 1909 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Mar 1945 - Kia - Germany
         Buried:  - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Dorothy Grogan (living)




General Notes (Husband)

"Bruce, a little son of Mr. W.M. Hagood of Easley, cut off 3 of his toes with an axe. Dr. Gilliland, Jr. sewed them back."

Source: "Pickens Sentinel", Thursday 3 May 1888 ************************************************************************** ************************************** "C. B. Hagood entered Clemson College." Source: "People's Journal" Thursday 19 October 1899 ************************************************************************** ***************************************


General Notes for Child Albert Starke Hagood

On memorial marker at Hagood Cemetery: "IN MEMORIUM" LT. ALBERT STARKE HAGOOD s/o RUTH STARKE & C. BRUCE HAGOOD B. JUN 1909 PICKENS, SC D. MAR 1945 KILLED IN ACTION BURIED AT HENRI CHAPPELLE, BELGIUM


Courtney Lane Hagood



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Wife Courtney Lane Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: William Frank Hagood
         Mother: Dedra Ann Justus





David Maybank Hagood Jr.



Husband David Maybank Hagood Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: David Maybank Hagood
         Mother: Elizabeth Houston McMillan


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David Maybank Hagood and Elizabeth Houston McMillan



Husband David Maybank Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Benjamin Ambler Hagood
         Mother: Derrill Taber Maybank


       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Houston McMillan (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 M Benjamin Alexander Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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2 F Caroline Mcmillan Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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3 M David Maybank Hagood Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

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Derrill Taber Hagood



Husband (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Derrill Taber Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Benjamin Ambler Hagood
         Mother: Penelope Read Lilly





Ralph Douglas Porch and Dorothy Ethel Hagood



Husband Ralph Douglas Porch 1

           Born: 14 Nov 1904 - Alexander City, AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Nov 1980 - Shreveport, LA
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 21 Dec 1935 - Birmingham, AL




Wife Dorothy Ethel Hagood 1

           Born: 28 May 1910 - Birmingham, AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Oct 1989 - Bossier City, LA
         Buried: 


         Father: Edward Gustavus Hagood (1875-1969) 1
         Mother: Ethel Erminie Massey (1878-1969) 1





Children
1 F Gwendolyn Porch (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Frank Chaney Pearce (living)




General Notes (Wife)

.


George Leighton Grantham Jr. and Dorothy Folger Hagood



Husband George Leighton Grantham Jr.

           Born: 24 Nov 1920 - Lumberton, NC
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Dec 1995
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Community, Pickens, SC
       Marriage: 20 Jun 1942 - Easley Presbyterian Church, Easley, SC




Wife Dorothy Folger Hagood 1

           Born: 20 May 1921
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Jul 1994 - Easley, SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Community, Pickens, SC


         Father: Ben Folger Hagood (1896-1975) 1
         Mother: Margaret Elizabeth Sellers (1897-1981) 1



   Other Spouse: George L Grantham Jr



Children
1 M George Leighton Grantham III (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Charlotte Beverly Davis (living)



2 F Dorothy Hagood Grantham (details suppressed for this person)

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3 M James Hagood Grantham (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Patricia Diane Bobo (living)




General Notes (Wife)

"Easley - Dorothy Hagood Grantham, 73, died Thursday in a local hospital. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Saturday in Easley Presbyterian Church. Burial, directed by Robinson Funeral Home, will be in Hagood Family Cemetery." "Surviving are her husband, George L. Grantham Jr; two sons, George L. Grantham III and James H. Grantham, both of Easley; a daughter, Dorothy G. Reid of Columbia; a brother, Ben F. Hagood Jr. of Pickens; and four grandchildren." Source: Obituary, "The Greenville News"


Notes (Marriage)

The bride's aunt, Fay Sellers Smith, played the violin for the wedding and Virgil Sellers Gresham, another aunt of the bride sang. According to those attending the wedding, it was an extremely warm day.


Earl Vernon Hagood and Pauline Hyrne



Husband Earl Vernon Hagood 2

           Born: Abt 1868
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Wife Pauline Hyrne 2

           Born: Abt 1872
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           Died: 
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         Father: Henry Hyrne (1847-1916) 2
         Mother: Elizabeth Woodward (Abt 1850-      ) 2





Edward Buck Hagood



Husband Edward Buck Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Albert Starke Hagood Jr.
         Mother: Helen Gould Buck


       Marriage: 




Wife (details suppressed for this person)

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Edward Gustavus Hagood and Ethel Erminie Massey



Husband Edward Gustavus Hagood 1

           Born: 5 Feb 1875 - AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Nov 1969 - Blount Co., AL
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 15 Jun 1899 - Jefferson Co., AL




Wife Ethel Erminie Massey 1

           Born: 28 Oct 1878 - AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Mar 1969 - Oneonta, AL
         Buried: 


         Father: John Eubanks Massey (1848-1940) 1
         Mother: Nancy Emma Ellis (1854-1881) 1





Children
1 F Emmie Katherine Hagood 1

           Born: 20 Jul 1900 - Birmingham, AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 May 1982 - Cartersville, GA
         Buried: 
         Spouse: David Ellie Harris (living)



2 F Eugenia Franklin Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Malcolm Graham Vinzant (living)



3 F Dorothy Ethel Hagood 1

           Born: 28 May 1910 - Birmingham, AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Oct 1989 - Bossier City, LA
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ralph Douglas Porch (1904-1980) 1
           Marr: 21 Dec 1935 - Birmingham, AL




General Notes (Wife)

Source: Frank Pearce


General Notes for Child Dorothy Ethel Hagood

.


Edwin Augustus Hagood



Husband Edwin Augustus Hagood

           Born: 10 May 1810
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         Father: Johnson Hagood (1771-1816) 1
         Mother: Mary Ann O'hear (1774-1843) 1


       Marriage: 




Wife

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Eleanore Hagood



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Wife Eleanore Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Benjamin Adger Hagood (1866-1928) 1
         Mother: Mary Eleanor Morrow (1871-1950) 1





James Calhoun Wade and Elise Erle Hagood



Husband James Calhoun Wade 1

           Born: 3 Dec 1915 - Carlowville, AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Nov 1979 - Carlowville, AL
         Buried:  - Carlowville Cemetery Carlowville, AL


         Father: Theodore Lee Wade (1876-1926) 1
         Mother: Georgie Wade (1877-1962) 1


       Marriage: 




Wife Elise Erle Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 M James Calhoun Wade (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Elizabeth Ann Till (living)



2 M Robert Hagood Wade (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Jane Doswell (living)





Eliza Ann Hagood



Husband (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Eliza Ann Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: James Hagood (1744-1823) 1
         Mother: 





Francis A Miles and Eliza Elvina Hagood



Husband Francis A Miles 1

           Born:  - Greenville Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: Jun 1903 - Greenville, SC
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 31 Dec 1857 - Pickens Co., SC




Wife Eliza Elvina Hagood 1

           Born: 1830 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Apr 1918 - Greenville, SC
         Buried: 


         Father: Benjamin Hagood (1788-1865) 1 3
         Mother: Adeline Hagood Ambler (1808-1877) 1



Noted events in her life were:
Census, Pickens District, SC, 1850



Francis A. Miles and Eliza M. Hagood



Husband Francis A. Miles

           Born: Unknown
     Christened: 
           Died: Unknown
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Eliza M. Hagood

           Born: 19 Nov 1836
     Christened: 
           Died: 1920
         Buried: 


         Father: Benjamin Hagood (1788-1865) 1 3
         Mother: Adeline Hagood Ambler (1808-1877) 1




General Notes (Husband)

"Dr. Francis Miles was the first doctor in Pickens with an office in his home where the first Baptist Church stands (1958)." Source: "It Happened in Pickens County" by Pearl S. McFall, 1959 ************************************************************************** *************************************** "Dr. Miles was the first practicing physician in Pickens, a real (horseback) country doctor and his old saddlebags are still in existence. They had property in Greenville and spent their last years there." Source: Newspaper article, not dated, by Pearl McFall ************************************************************************** *************************************** "Among the scant scattering of known early dwellings (in the newly created Pickens of 1869), other than the previously noted Hagood house (on Lot 21), was the adjacent residence on Lot No. 11 at the northeast corner of Main and Lewis Streets, belonging to John W. Major..............Dr. Francis Miles, the first physician in New Pickens, built his house across Main Street directly opposite the Major House. Lot No. 14, referred to for many years as 'Miles Corner,' is the current site of the sanctuary of First Baptist Church. Dr. Miles, who returned to Greenville in 1876, married Eliza Hagood, a sister of Colonel J.E. Hagood. In later years, Dr. Miles was the proprietor of the Caesar's Head Hotel." Source: "Pickens: The Town and The First Baptist Church" by Jane Boroughs Morris, 1991 ************************************************************************** *************************************** Description of Caesar's Head Hotel on Hotel stationery: "The scenery from this Mountain presents a panoramic view, varied, grand and beautiful beyond description. Objects three hundred miles apart are distinctly seen by the unaided eye. The extent of view is only limited by the capacity of vision. In the vicinity are numerous Water Falls, unsurpassed for beauty. the altitude and latitude combined form a climate unparalleled with an atmosphere cool, dry soft and balmy, wonderfully invigorating - a veritable 'elixir of life' - having an average temperature of from 50 to 70 degrees charming the visitor into a pleasant forgetfulness of the burning heat left behind. Malarial Diseases cannot exist here. All affections of the Respiratory Organs, Consumption, Asthma, Hay Fever and General Debility promptly relieved. The Hotel is surrounded by magnificent shade trees and beautiful grassy lawns, commanding extended views of the surrounding country from every nook and corner. Near the Hotel is a Mineral Spring containing Protoxide of Iron, Chlorine, Magnesia, Ailictic Acid, Soda and Sulphuric Acid. Abundant Springs of Cold, free-stone water. Delightful walks and drives. Capacity of Hotel and Cottages about 200. Every possible convenience provided. Daily Mails. How to reach Caesar's Head.- Come via Greenville, S.C. to Marietta, S.C. or Brevard, N.C. Distance from either place 16 miles. Time, 4 to 5 hours by hack; good roads through a charming country.
F.A. Miles, M.D., Proprietor ************************************************************************** *************************************** "This delightful summer resort will be open to visitors o the 1st of June. This elevated situation (4,500 feet above the level of the sea) presents all that could be desired in the way of climate, whilst is grand and beautiful beyond description, an ever changing panorama. for all diseases of the Throat, Lungs, Hay Fever, Malarial affectations, the climate is unequaled. For the overworked and debilitated it is an Elixir of Life."
"Near the Hotel is a
MINERAL SPRING
possessing fine tonic alternative properties.
Visitors coming to Greenville, S.C., will find a
REGULAR HACK LINE
leaving the commercial hotels every Tuesday and Saturday,
Returning again on Monday and Friday,
Fare $3.50 per seat each way.
Charges at the Hotel Moderate, Table Good,
Rooms Clean, Servants Attentive.
F.A. MILES, PROPRIETOR."
(Greenville Paper, July 8, 1879) ************************************************************************** *************************************** Name: Connestee Falls (approximately 10 miles from Caesar's Head, SC)

County: Transylvania (North Carolina)

Height: 110 feet

Water Source: Carson Creek

Mountains: Blue Ridge Mountains

Park: Connestee Falls

Owner: Private

Trail Length (one-way): Few feet

Trail Difficulty (scale: 0 easy-10 very difficult): --

Beauty Rating (scale: 10 highest): 7

Wheelchair Accessible: No


-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----- Facts: According to Indian lore, the Princess Connestee leapt to her death over the falls after her English husband returned to his people. Dr. F. A. Miles named these falls for the Indian princess in 1882.

Information retrieved online by MGHB/2002 Source: http://www.itpi.dpi.state.nc.us/caroclips/wfalls/connesteefalls.html


General Notes (Wife)

"Married - On the 31st ult., by Rev. J.M. Runion, Dr. F.A. Miles of Greenville and Miss Eliza, daughter of Col. Benjamin Hagood of Pickens". Source: The Keowee Courier, 1849-1851,1857-1861,1865-1868" by Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., Southern Historical Press. ************************************************************************** *************************************** "The Greenville and Pickens newspapers of Sept. 1897, carried the following announcement: 'A splendid donation to a noble institution was made recently by Dr. and Mrs. F.A. Miles, of Pickens and Greenville, when they deeded their Caesar's Head resort of 2,231 acres to Furman University.' Besides the land, the gift included all buildings and furniture, tools, vehicles and livestock. No appraisal value was given, other than the fact that they had refused $20,000 cash for the property several years prior to this. The conditions named by the donors were that the Furman trustees would pay them $800 annuity each year during the life of both, or either of the donors, and allow them free board either in the hotel or one of the cottages during the summer season. The friends of Furman University were delighted with this memorial from the donors who said they wanted to help the cause of Christian education through this local school. Mrs. Eliza H. Miles was a daughter of Col. Benjamin Hagood who established the hotel at Caesar's Head at an early date and from whom she had inherited the property. Her husband, Dr. F. A. Miles, had done much to improve it and enhance its value and for more than twenty years they ran a successful summer resort, but when the infirmities of old age overtook them, and they had no children, they decided to pass it on to the immediate good of Furman University. In the early days of Pickens, Dr. and Mrs. Miles had a home here where they stayed during the months that the summer resort was closed. Their little house stood on the corner where the First Baptist Church now stands." Source: Newspaper article, not dated, by Pearl McFall ************************************************************************** *************************************** Promissory Note: $1250.94 One day after date we, or either of us, promise to pay J.E. Hagood, or bearer, Twelve Hundred and fifty 94/100 Dollars for value received; balance due on Caesar's Head property on account of John H. Hagood's interest.
Witness my hand and seal March 12th 1897.
(signed) E.M. Miles (L.S.)
(signed) F.A. Miles (L.S.)

Promissory Note: Greenville, SC February 25, 1895 One day after dated I promise to pay to J.E. Hagood, my Trustee, or Bearer, three hundred dollars, for value received, balance due him for amount paid for purchase of Caesar's Head and furniture in the Hotel at Caesar's Head.
Witness my hand and seal.
(signed) E.M. Miles (L.S.)

Principal. (2 notes.) $1550.94 Int. on above notes to 1st Sept 1897 $ 94.19
________ Total $1645.13

************************************************************************** *************************************** Letter on Caesar's Head Hotel stationery, dated August 23, 1897:

Mr. W.M. Hagood Easley, SC

My Dear Sir, The situation here is unchanged. Dr. Miles was a good deal depressed after you left, but has now recovered his usual cheerfulness. He thought that matters were settled, and it was a great disappointment to him to find himself at sea again, he still thinks the last payment of $500, per annum too small and thinks they should have been $700 per annum. He and Mrs. Miles have now determined to sell the place for what they can get and are in communication with parties with that end in view. Failing in that I think their plan will be to offer it to someone on the same terms it was offered to you except that the last payments will be larger. I am very sorry that the arrangement fell through, first because I think the place ought to continue to be the property of your family, and second because I cannot help thinking there is big money in it.

Very truly yours, G.G. Wells ************************************************************************** *************************************** Letter to W.M. Hagood, Easley, SC, from his father James Earle Hagood, dated August 23, 1897 concerning Caesar's Head property: Dear Willie: I examined for the notes upon my return to the City of your Auntie, Mrs. Miles, and I found them in the right place. Ben certainly did not look for them very much. I send you copies of the notes so that you may see the amounts and interest up to 1st Sept. 1897 is $1645.13. I was sorry that you did not conclude the trade, but suppose it was best that you did not, although the property is well worth the amount that you would have to pay. I put the property at $5000.00 - and the furniture & c. at $3000. - the Saluda plantation at $3000. - which would make a total of $11,000.00- You would have to pay me the amount due $1645.13- and $1000. - cash next fall, and I think that you would then have the property cheap enough. The Saluda plantation ought to be sold for enough to pay me and the $1000. - besides, and perhaps more, and then you would have Caesar's Head proper, without having to pay anything for it, except the $500.- a year to your Auntie. These are however matters for your own judgement as I do not desire to suggest or make any proposition as my being Trustee might some day interfere with the sale, and I will not advise what for you to do. I think that you could pay the $500. - very well per year, say for ten years, or longer, as the property would certainly increase in value. You would have to spend at least a thousand dollars on improvements which is a very small figure. If the property was mine, I would spend $2000. - on it so as to make it attractive. We have had fine rains for the last week, raining all the time. Hope you have had good rains also. No news. Yours truly, (signed) J.E. Hagood ************************************************************************** *************************************** Letter from Eliza Hagood Miles to W. M. Hagood, on Caesar's Head Hotel stationery dated August 24, 1897: Dear Willie: I received your letter yesterday. We regret more than we can express that you could not accept the proposition. The last amount named we don't think either one of us could live on and have any comforts, unless we are compelled. We regret more, that we have given you all so much trouble. We will try now and sell the place for what we can get for it, and pay what we owe, and try and live the few days we may have on the balance. We are more than sorry to have to place go out of the family, but is seems that there is no other chance. We appreciate your kind offer of assistance and will call on you. Now let me thank you for sending the buggy. I hope your Uncle will be able to ride occasionally although he is very weak. He had a bad night - did not sleep any and of course I don't sleep. Anything now makes him nervous. I was afraid your letter would but I had to read it to him. We are still having a good deal of company. I am kept busy. I am confident that you could have made this place pay you handsomely. ? as you are. You could make more than the interest and repair the place besides, I am so glad that Queenie is with us she certainly is a great comfort and help. I do hope and pray that I will be given strength to stand all I have too. If you know of any one coming up this way I would be so glad if you would send me a bucket of fresh butter. I find it so hard to get enough up this way. We have so much constatne(?) company. I think Capt. Wells wrote to you yesterday. We have to have fires very cool. I will her to close as breakfast is about ready and there are a good many to leave this a.m. Come and see us when you can. Always glad to see you. Love to all. As ever your devoted, (signed) Auntie Miles ************************************************************************** ***************************************Letter from James Earle Hagood to his son W.M. Hagood concerning the Caesar's Head property dated Sept., 18, 1897 from Greenville, SC: Dear Willie, I find that I will not make connection from Spartanburg by getting off from here today, so I will write to you a few lines. I had a long talk with Capt. Wells, in reference to the property. He says he did all he could to put them off from executing the papers which contains the proposition to the University, three Baptist ministers were at the mountain for a week or ten days and they fixed it all themselves, the arrangement was already made with the ministers without the knowledge of Capt. Wells, he says it was all done and agreed to before it was ever mentioned to him, he was then employed to prepare the papers, after he came down here/ they have all bee prepared and ready for signature, and acceptance by the board of trustees. They pay only eight hundred dollars per annum and no more. Capt. Wells says that he was not let into the secret for sometime for after they had agreed about it and then only to get him to draw up the papers. He says he did all that he could to postpone the thing and told them not to be in a hurry and wait for sometime to see if something would not turn up but they both seemed delighted after it was done and was the very thing which they wished to have done. I will miss connection tonight but will go to Spartanburg on the vertbule which is two and a half hours late. They told me that the telephone was burnt out and we could not talk. (signed) J.E. Hagood ************************************************************************** *************************************** Notes from Ben Folger Hagood made approximately 1995 concerning the history of the Caesar's Head property: 1847 - Benjamin Hagood acquired property 1848 - Will of Benjamin Hagood drawn leaving property to daughter Elmina Hagood Martin. 1865 - Benjamin Hagood Died. 1866 - Elmina H. Martin wanted to sell (sales notice) - decided not to sell - other properties given to her in lieu of Caesar's Head inheritance - property then put in trust and later deeded to her sister, Eliza Hagood Miles - married to Dr. F.A. Miles, M.D. - a devout Baptist. Mrs. Miles wanted to sell the property to her Hagood nieces and nephews in 1897 for $2,400. They could not agree and Dr. & Mrs. Miles deeded the property to Furman University with the provision that Mrs. Miles & companion (Miss Peete) be allowed to spend the entire season rent free (including board). Mrs. Miles lived 20 years longer & died at age 94 in 1917. Dr. Ben Geer was President of Furman at that time and there was considerable consternation about the cost to Furman prior to her death. ************************************************************************** *************************************** THE DRAMATIC HISTORY OF CAESAR'S HEAD: (As published in "Echoes: Reflections of the Past", published by eighth grade students at Northwest Middles School, Travelers, Rest, S.C., 1987.) "The trip going up to Caesar's Head was a fearful one. The roads were curved at almost a ninety degree angle. As for the rest of the trip it was a breathtaking sight." "When we arrived at our destination, we could feel the environment change. It was windy, but not too chilly. It was comfortable. We went up to the viewing area and were amazed at what we saw. The beautiful majestic mountains rolled down to the Piedmont. Paris Mountain and Table Rock were the most noticeable sights." "Caesar's Head, a large natural rock formation, is a popular tourist and resort attraction. The elevation for Caesar's Head is 3,266 feet above sea level." "The origin of the name "Caesar's Head" is still unknown. Many stories say the rock bears a likeness to Julius Caesar, while others say 'Caesar' is a mispronunciation of 'Sachem' which means Indian chief. The most believed origin is that it was named a after a mountaineer's dog named Caesar." " 'The Head' has gone through many natural changes during the past 100 years. At one time a part of the mouth fell off. Most people seem to believe it was the result of a minor earthquake." "Other natural changes, many manmade changes were added to Caesar's Head. Indians were the first people to use this land. The next people were the British. In 1735, the British Crown sent surveyors to this area to set a boundary between North and South Carolina. The surveyors had a difficult time and went on strike because they were not paid. Finally, when the boundaries were set, Caesar's Head ended up on the South Carolina side, extremely close to North Carolina." "It was over a hundred years after this until the first building was built on the land. As one news article reported, in 1836, Benjamin Hagood built a house there. Another source said that it was built in 1851." "Then in 1864, on the same land, a hotel was built. The building included the kitchen, the dining room and the lobby. It was two stories high." "The hotel became a popular place to get away from the heat of the Low Country. In a booklet by Lawrence Fay Brewster called 'Summer Migrations and Resorts of South Carolina Low Country Planters,' the hotel is described as 'noted for its excellent fare and amiable proprietor.' " "In 1885, a three-story addition was made. When we went to interview Mr. Norwood Cleveland in the little town of Marietta, he mentioned that his father, Mays Cleveland, cut some of the lumber to build the hotel: 'It (the hotel) was started with my dad (Mays Cleveland). He used to run a sawmill, and they got him to cut some of the lumber to build the hotel with.' " "After it was built, all types of people began coming to the hotel for a change of environment. Another news article by Felix L. Oswald, written in 'The Southern Bivouac', a newspaper from the year 1886, described Caesar's Head in this way: 'It (Caesar's Head) is a thoroughly democratic summer resort. In the commodious hotel the most exclusive guest can enjoy the privileges of privacy, but those privileges imply no prescriptive rights. In the office of the proprietor the poor mountain boy with his little courtesy.......the North Carolina hunter in his home-made jeans will promptly and intelligently answer the questions of the female naturalist fresh from Vassar, or even show his superior discretion by ignoring the banter of a supercilious dud. Blue jeans, indeed, mingle quite freely with the gayer colors of the weekly picnic parties, but if the absence of constraint is the surest mark of good breeding, the society of Caesar's Head can rank with the best of the civilized world.' " "The F.A. Miles (Eliza Hagood Miles) family owned the land in the late 1800's, and they published advertisements for hotel. IN one newspaper, the article described it so well, that they even exaggerated the elevation of the land by more than 1,00 feet:

'This elevated situation (4,500 feet above the level of the sea) presents all that could be desired in the way of climate, whilst the scenery is grand and beautiful beyond description -- an everchanging panorama. For all diseases of the throat and lungs, hay fever and malarial affections (sic), the climate is unequaled. For the over-worked and debilitated it is an elixir of life. Near the hotel is a mineral spring possessing fine tonic and alternative qualities.' 'Visitors coming to Greenville, S.C., will find a regular hack line leaving the commercial hotel every Tuesday and Saturday, returning again on Monday and Friday. Fare $3.50 per seat, each way. Charges at the hotel moderate. Table good. Rooms clean. Servants attentive. F.A. Miles, Proprietor.' "

"In September of 1897, Mrs. Eliza M. Hagood Miles and Dr. F.A. Miles transferred the property; to Furman University. This property included 2,500 acres of land, with the hotel, and a few cottages. All this was in exchange for an annuity of $800.00 and free boarding and lodging for Dr. and Mrs. Miles. Mrs. Miles, who was seventy-four at the time, lived another twenty years." "During the time Furman owned it Norwood Cleveland visited the hotel. When we talked to Mr. Cleveland he told us that he rode a train to the dances up on the mountain. He also said, 'We'd go up when we were young boys. Most of them would get on it in Greenville, but I got on up here. From Greenville it took about an hour and a half, but from Marietta it took about thirty minutes. We'd all get off at River Falls and then walk up Gap Creek. That was the shortest route and the steepest. It took about two hours. We'd get there in time for supper, and then we'd go up and see the sunset before we went to the square dance. The next morning we'd get up early and come back on the next train ride home. The cost of the ride from Greenville was fifty cents, and from Marietta it was thirty cents, I think." "We asked Mr. Cleveland if he remembered anything about the dances. He said, 'We wouldn't miss the dance. That's what we went for. Most of the girls worked there in the dining room. We had a wonderful time.' We asked Mr. Cleveland if he ever had a girlfriend up there. He replied, 'Oh yea, the girl didn't have me, but I had her!' Mr. Cleveland continued telling us about the dances. 'I don't imagine there were over twenty people at the dances. Most were college-aged. I remember we had an old fashioned piano, but I don't remember who the pianist was. I don't remember who the caller was, but we couldn't have a square dance without a caller.' Even Mr. Cleveland himself did some calling at the dances. According to a newspaper article a man called 'Speedy' Jones did the calling at the dances." "We asked Mr. Cleveland if he remembered anything about the prices of the hotel, and he said, 'The prices weren't too expensive, but they were expensive for us because we didn't have hardly any money at all. They were about $3.00 a night.' " "Mr. Cleveland described one other event that he enjoyed: 'A most enjoyable experience was right after supper before sundown. We'd all walk up the the head and sit there until the sun went down. All the people from the hotel went there. The young people sat in the mouth. They liked that better because it was a lot more dangerous.' " "During the 1920's, the hotel was sold to a real estate corporation, the Caesar's Head-Paris Mountain Company. Tom Marchant, who later bought the hotel along with his brother, Pete, told us about what happened to the property next: 'The company didn't have enough money to keep going and the property went to the people that were holding the mortgage. At that particular time (1932), two banks and Furman University held the property. The three of them held it, and Furman University ran the hotel.' " "In the 1920's a new road was built going up to Caesar's Head. Pete Marchant told us how the road was first built. 'They say that Jones Gap Road was laid out by an old mountaineer named Solomon Jones, who had a pig. He'd turn the pig loose and follow it up the mountain, and that would be the easiest way. That was supposedly the way. But that road was so windy and curvy that on several turns you had to back your car up before you could get around the curve. You'd start around and have to back up a piece and make another turn to get around the curve. That was one reason they built this other road, to have a modern highway up there." " 'Back then, all they had to build that road was one steam shovel. All of the dirt was moved with mules and a man with what they called a pan. The steam shovel would dig the dirt out, and these people behind the mules would take this pan and move all that dirt and rock to build to build the road with. So it was quite an engineering feat. They say there are about 300 to 400 horses and mules buried beneath that road. When they would die they would just put them beneath the road and keep going.' " The road was not the only thing that was different back then. Electricity in the hotel was rare, unlike today's hotels. Pete Marchant said that, 'Every night about 10 o'clock they'd blow a whistle or sound a bell to let you know in 15 minutes the lights were going to go off. And they weren't going to come back on until the next morning or the next day. In that period of the 1920's and about half of the 1930's, Duke Power was not in there, and electricity was not used too much. The generator ran on diesel fuel. It was one of these old reciprocal pumps and you could hear it all over the mountain. Whoo! Whoo! They'd keep it on till 12:30 on Saturday night so you could go to the square dance. The square dance ended at 12:00, and you could get home in time. When the lights blinked, you were gone. All of us had kerosene lanterns and candles i the houses. We even had some with reflectors behind the. They sat on the wall to give more light.' " "An interesting coincidence was noted in the registration book they had at the hotel. In 1918 one person signed in by the name of F.D. Roosevelt, from New York." "Pete and Tom Marchant bought the hotel in 1946 and ran it in the summer. The hotel was not very luxurious, but it had forty rooms on the first and second floor, and fifteen on the top floor. A single hotel room would cost $20.00 per week. A double room with a bath would be $27.00 per person, per week. Children under ten were charged one-half of the rate, and colored servants stayed at half rate too. These prices are from the late 1940's and included all three meals per day." "The hotel had a feast every Sunday. As Pete Marchant remembered, 'For breakfast you had y9our choice of cereal, fruit, eggs, sausage, bacon toast, and pancakes. Everything was served family style.' " For Sunday dinner, Pete said, 'We had roast beef, fried chicken, and about four or five different vegetables. Mostly the people we had up there were elderly people, people well over 50 or 60. The ladies would dress with their big hats on for the afternoon tea. It was really quite a sight to see them all. Our whole front porch, which was about 50 or 70 feet long, was solid with rockers, and they would sit out there and rock'. " " 'Practically everybody stayed at the hotel, I'd say, for a week. Very few people came by to spend a day. They'd come up and sty with us for a week at a time.' " "A few people working on "Echoes" interviewed a man by the name of James McJunkin who worked there by carrying up bags to the rooms. He said, 'Guys would come up here with plenty of money from Charleston to stay at the hotel.' We also asked him about the working conditions and the money he made by working at the hotel. He replied, 'It was good service; they treated you good. I remember on year, way after the Depression, I left after the summer with $500 in tips. I got up to $20-$25 a week in salary." "James McJunkin walked seven miles up the mountain to go to work at Caesar's Head. His brother, Otis McJunkin, was the cook at Caesar's Head for 18 years." "We interviewed another man, Spann Cruell, who used to be a bellboy at the Caesar's Head Hotel in the early 1950's. He also cleared the tables and ran errands. We asked him about any special holidays, and he replied, 'One lady by the name of Mrs. Earle was real old. On Christmas in July, I had to serve her breakfast. Christmas in July was when the tenants in the rooms would give gifts or extra money (as tips) to the bellboys.' " "He also spoke of the square dance that was held on Saturday nights. He would attend some dances. We also asked him about his salary and tips. He replied, 'It was $3.00 a day in salary, and in tips it varied. One summer I remember I collected $67.00 in tips at dinner, $45.00 at breakfast, and $47.00 for supper. And if you had to deliver a special order to one of the rooms they would give you a larger tip.' " "Sometimes the people who ran the hotel had to do more than just check the customers into the rooms. Pete Marchant said, "This lad checked in and she didn't like anything. But then some electricity wouldn't work in the rooms. She came back and wanted the electricity in her room immediately. So I went down and found it wasn't anything but her plug on something she wanted to plug in, and I fixed if for her. She offered me a dollar. Tome said, 'Did you take it?' and I said, "Yea, I took it.' It didn't make any difference. She didn't know who I was. That night they introduced us as the owners of the hotel and she was quite embarrassed about her dollar.' " "Pete Marchant told us another story about how he used to be a two-in-one person when people checked in: 'I would hit the bell and run around, and there would be a corner on the other side for the bellboy to pick up the bags.' In this way, he would serve as a clerk and as a bellboy." "Pete Marchant also explained to us about the plumbing in the hotel. 'Bathrooms were on the halls like an old-fashioned hotel. You had a big central bathroom, on the downstairs, one for the ladies and one for the men. And then upstairs there were two for the men and two for the ladies.' The rooms earlier had porcelain pots and pitchers for guest to use." "There were no keys to the rooms. Pet Marchant told us there were 'no locks, no keys. We didn't have a key in the place. You didn't have a key to your room.' Unlike today, almost everybody knew and trusted everybody else." "The Marchants liked to open the hotel with a convention and close it with a convention at the end of the summer. After that, the women's college of Furman University would have an orientation weekend for its freshmen there. IN the summer of 1954, the week after the women from Furman left, the hotel burned." "The hotel was destroyed by fire of an undetermined cause. The fire was discovered by Hagood Bruce and Frank T. Morris of Greenville. Mr. Morris, who was awakened by the sound of the crackling flames, called the fire rangers and went to the hotel." "one newspaper article reported that 'Fire raced in minutes through the three-story wooden structure, at 1:00 A.M. and consumed also an adjacent cottage and servant quarters in the rear. Three cottages connected with the hotel were saved, but the rest, including furnishing in 50 rooms, a lounge and a dining room, was a total loss.' The only fire-fighting equipment at the hotel was fire extinguishers, and there was no chance to use them. The only water available was from the low-pressure system which served the hotel, and the nearest fire department was in the Parker District 25 miles away. The buildings burned too quickly for aid to be called." "One opinion on the cause of the fire was stated by Pete Marchant. 'WE really think that somebody had gotten into the hotel and was spending the night. We had already cut all the electricity off, and it started down in one of the far rooms where somebody had gone in there to sleep. At least that's what the caretaker seems to think happened.' " "One of the major losses from the burning of the hotel was the linen. When we asked Pete Marchant about the linen, he told us 'We always cleaned the linen, had it washed and took it back to the hotel and stored it. And unfortunately, that year, I had taken the linen back up and stored it with all the blankets and everything in the hotel the weekend before it burned.' " "There were only a couple of items that were saved, according to Pete Marchant. 'The hotel had two bells, a dinner bell and a porter bell. Earlier I had had them polished and all, but the heat was so intense, even in the safe, that the bells were quite disfigured.' "

Pete Marchant told us one interesting story that happened in the last days of the hotel. 'The year the hotel burned, that summer we took the original old hotel and were going to convert it to just a place to have parties. The walls had green whitewash, and so we took one room that wasn't being occupied and rubbed the whitewash off of it. There on the wall was an inscription with a man's name from Abbeville. (It wasn't even Abbeville County the.) It was dated a hundred years to the day, that we rubbed it off. That was the day he'd been at Caesar's Head.' " " 'Our father used to go up there as a young man. They'd leave Greer on a wagon and spend the night on the way up there. From Greer to Caesar's Head, it would take them two days to get up there. They had to spend the night. That was one reason you got the name Travelers Rest up here because that was where a lot of people got off the train from Charleston. ' "

"Even though the Caesar's Head Hotel no longer exists, Caesar's Head is still a beautiful place to escape the heat. It is presently a state park, where thousands of visitors come to enjoy the enchanting sights. Although many changes have occurred, the most important aspect has not changed, and that is the superb view from the rock itself."


David Ralph Spearman and Elizabeth Hagood



Husband David Ralph Spearman 1

           Born: 11 Sep 1903 - Anderson County, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 May 1973 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
       Marriage: 10 Sep 1931




Wife Elizabeth Hagood 1

           Born: 20 Dec 1910 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Jun 1984 - Easley, SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: William Millikin Hagood Jr (1889-1956) 1
         Mother: Bernice Going (1887-1967) 1





Children
1 M David Hagood Spearman (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Martha Lee Cordle (living)



2 M William Benjamin Spearman (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Laura Smith (living)



3 F Sarah Elizabeth Spearman (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: John Marshall Spearman (living)



4 F Sara Elizabeth Spearman (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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5 F Judith Hagood Spearman 1

           Born: 1943 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Feb 1999 - Easley, Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Salvatore Thomas Biscotto (living)





Elizabeth Allison Hagood



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Wife Elizabeth Allison Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Father: George Cleveland Hagood Jr.
         Mother: Susan Timmerman





William Henry Oakman and Elizabeth Ann Hagood



Husband William Henry Oakman 1

           Born: 1792 - Savannah, GA
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Mar 1860 - SC
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 28 Nov 1820 - SC




Wife Elizabeth Ann Hagood 1

           Born: 24 Oct 1800 - SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Johnson Hagood (1771-1816) 1
         Mother: Mary Ann O'hear (1774-1843) 1





Children
1 M Wellington Oakman 1

           Born: 19 Mar 1830 - Augusta, GA
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 May 1897 - Eastover, SC
         Buried: 





Elizabeth Bently Hagood



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Wife Elizabeth Bently Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Father: James Morrow Hagood III
         Mother: Jane Bryant Neil





Pickens Mccollum Lindsay and Elizabeth Early Hagood



Husband Pickens Mccollum Lindsay (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Wife Elizabeth Early Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Father: Ben Folger Hagood Jr (1926-2001) 1
         Mother: Jeanne Northrop Earley





Children
1 F Elizabeth Hagood Lindsay (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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2 M Pickens Mccollum Lindsay Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Champ Lagford Jr. and Elizabeth Jane Hagood



Husband Champ Lagford Jr.

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 7 Feb 1854 - Mount Pinson, Jefferson Co., AL




Wife Elizabeth Jane Hagood

           Born: Abt 1836 - Hagood's Crossroads, Jefferson Co., AL
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1880 - Alabama
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Jackson Hagood (1815-1860)
         Mother: Nancy M. Hale (Abt 1814-      )





Josiah Truss and Elizabeth S. Hagood



Husband Josiah Truss (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Wife Elizabeth S. Hagood

           Born: 25 Mar 1827 - Jefferson Co., AL
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Aug 1862
         Buried: 


         Father: Dr. Zachariah Hagood (1792-1875)
         Mother: Nancy Nash (1798-1829)





Ella Rosa Hagood



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Wife Ella Rosa Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Father: James O'hear Hagood (1804-      ) 1
         Mother: Indiana M. Allen (      -      ) 1





Phillip Bower Martin and Elmira Elkins Hagood



Husband Phillip Bower Martin 1

           Born: 4 Jan 1826 - Charleston, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Dec 1871 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: Jesse M. Martin (1805-1889) 1
         Mother: Jane Owen (      -1893) 1


       Marriage: 




Wife Elmira Elkins Hagood 1

           Born: 31 Mar 1834 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jul 1911 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: Benjamin Hagood (1788-1865) 1 3
         Mother: Adeline Hagood Ambler (1808-1877) 1



Noted events in her life were:
Census, Pickens District, SC, 1850



Children
1 M Jacob A Martin 1

           Born: 20 Jan 1849 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Oct 1905 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Mary C Clyde (1872-1956) 1



2 M Francis Albert Martin 1

           Born: 4 Feb 1857 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Jun 1886 - Greenville Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Com., Pickens, SC
         Spouse: Hattie Feaster (      -After 1886) 1
           Marr: 1884



3 F James Hamilton Martin

           Born: 19 Aug 1857 - Pickens County, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 May 1917 - Brownwood, TX
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelia Mayfield (      -      )



4 F Ann Adeline Martin

           Born: 13 Apr 1859 - Pickens County, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Jul 1860 - Pickens County, SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Com., Pickens, SC



5 F Anna Adeline Martin 1

           Born: 12 Apr 1859 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Jul 1860 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried: 



6 F Elizabeth Martin 1

           Born: 16 Oct 1861 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Dec 1952 - Travelers Rest, Greenville Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Com., Pickens, SC
         Spouse: Simeon Thomas McHugh (1856-1936) 1



7 F Ida Mama Martin 1

           Born: 27 Jun 1864 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Mar 1871 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Com., Pickens, SC



8 M Phillip Bower Martin 1

           Born: 18 Sep 1871 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Aug 1946 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Com., Pickens, SC
         Spouse: Rosa Emma Hendricks (1873-1919) 1
           Marr: 31 Jul 1892 - Pickens Co., SC




General Notes (Wife)

"From Table Mountain - Mesdames E.E. and P.B. Martin and S.T. McHugh have just finished up 75 yards of rag carpeting". Source: "Pickens Sentinel" Thursday 20 October 1892 ************************************************************************** ***************************************


General Notes for Child Francis Albert Martin

"Mr. F.A. Martin died at his home on the McClanahan place three miles above the city on Monday night. He was 29 years old and a native of Pickens County. He was married to Miss Hattie Feaster of this city about 18 months ago and went to live on the McClanahan place early in the spring. Burial in the Hagood family burying ground. Mr. Martin was a nephew of Col. J.E. Hagood. Burial was on the 23rd ult. by Revs. D.C. Freeman and S.R. Riley. (Greenville Daily News) Reprinted by "The Pickens Sentinel", Thursday, July 1, 1886.


General Notes for Child Elizabeth Martin

"A Spark from Oolenoy. Mrs. Simeon McHugh is teaching in this neighborhood." Source: "Pickens Sentinel" Thursday 27 July 1882 ************************************************************************** ***************************************


General Notes for Child Phillip Bower Martin

"P.B. Martin is going to move to the Matthew Hendricks place on the Oolenoy." Source: "Pickens Sentinel" Thursday 20 October 1892


Elvira Ann Hagood



Husband

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           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Elvira Ann Hagood (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gideon Hagood (      -      )
         Mother: Harriet Yonge (      -      )





William Wickliffe Robinson and Elvira Caroline Hagood



Husband William Wickliffe Robinson 1

            AKA: William Wickliffe Robinson
           Born: 19 Jul 1827 - Pendleton District, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jul 1886 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried: Aug 1886 - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: Dr. John Robinson (1792-1841) 1
         Mother: Eliza Blassingame (1800-1886) 1


       Marriage: 6 May 1852

Noted events in his life were:
Census, Pickens District, SC, 1860




Wife Elvira Caroline Hagood 1

           Born: 9 Jun 1829 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 May 1905 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Hagood Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC


         Father: Benjamin Hagood (1788-1865) 1 3
         Mother: Adeline Hagood Ambler (1808-1877) 1



Noted events in her life were:
Census, Pickens District, SC, 1860

Census, Pickens District, SC, 1850



Children
1 M Augustus B Robinson 1

           Born: 25 Aug 1853 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Sep 1863
         Buried:  - Hagood Family Cemetary, Twelve Mile Community, Pickens, SC



2 M James Edwin Robinson 1

           Born: 23 Nov 1857 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Aug 1920 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Lonie Eberhardt (1865-1934) 1
         Spouse: Martha O'dell (1859-1889) 1
           Marr: 1880



3 M Benjamin Hagood Robinson

           Born: 3 Dec 1855
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 M Benjamin Robinson 1

           Born: 1860 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 M Henry Arthur Robinson

           Born: 3 Jan 1860 - Pickens County, SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elizabeth Freeman (      -      )
           Marr: 18 May 1884



6 M William Walter Robinson 1

           Born: 22 Apr 1862 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Nov 1938 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Sarah Laura Elizabeth Payne (1868-1962) 1
           Marr: 15 Sep 1886



7 F Adaline Eliza Robinson 1

            AKA: Lydie
           Born: 2 Oct 1865 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 May 1943 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Barksdale Dunham Lenhardt (1864-1950) 1
           Marr: 4 Dec 1888



8 M John Blassinghame Robinson II 1

           Born: 29 Feb 1868 - Pickens Co., SC
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Oct 1936 - Pickens Co., SC
         Buried:  - Easley Cemetery, Pickens Co., SC
         Spouse: Eliza Estelle Boggs (1873-1951) 1
           Marr: 6 Oct 1897 - Easley, Pickens Co., SC



9 M Emory Arthur Robinson 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Nov 1928 - George's Creek, Pickens Co., SC
         Buried: 



10 F Lydie A. Robinson

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



11 M Benjamin Hagood Robinson

           Born: 3 Dec 1805
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Apr 1858
         Buried: 




General Notes (Wife)

From newspaper clipping (not dated) - Obituary: "Mrs. Elvira Robinson died last night at the home of her son, J.E. Robinson. Mrs. Robinson was a member of a prominent Pickens family. About a year ago, her brother, Col. J.E. Hagood, died at his home in Pickens. He was for many years clerk of the United States Court at Charleston. Her surviving brother is John Hagood of Greenville county, and her sisters are Mrs. F.A. Miles of Greenville, and Mrs. EBE> Martin of Greenville county. She leaves five children, who live in and near Easley. J.E. Robins, John Robinson, Arthur Robinson, W.W. Robinson and Mrs. E.E. Lenhardt. Her remains will be interred tomorrow in the old Hagood family burying ground near Pickens. "


General Notes for Child William Walter Robinson

"The first dwelling built on East Main Street was a two story frame house, built in 1878 and still as it was then. (1946) It was the home of W.W. Robinson, Sr. His son, W.W. Robinson, Jr. entered business with W.M. Hagood---general merchandise---during the middle eighties. This firm later became Robinson & Thornton, and still later W.W. Robinson Co. Source: From the article ""Where Easley Grew--A Lost Landscape" written by Alonzo Trezevant Folger in 1946 published in "Pickensville-Easley History" Forest Acres/McKissick Quest Program, Anne Sheriff, Teacher, pub. 1987-1988 ************************************************************************** *************************************** "Pickensville-Easley History" Forest Acres/McKissick Quest Program, Anne Sheriff, Teacher, pub. 1987-1988

"In1887, W.W. Robinson and his then partner, R.T. Thornton, operated a mercantile establishment offering an assortment of goods ranging from household items to groceries to buggies and wagons. Housed in one room upstairs was the 'casket department', where, when there was a death, the bereaved came to select a casket. There was no funeral home in Easley. A hundred years ago the funerals were held in a church, or in the family home. It was not until 1950 that Robinson's built a separate funeral home and the caskets were moved out of the department store. The actual date of the organization of the Robinson Company is lost in antiquity, but it is known to have existed as early as 1884. An old issue of The Keowee Courier of that year carried an advertisement for the Hagood Company of Easley, the parent company of Robinson's. The company was originally established by W.M. Hagood, an entrepreneur responsible for much of the early growth of Pickens County. W.W. Robinson was his associate in the business. Within a few years Hagood responded to the lure of the textile industry and sold his interest in he store to Robinson and his friend, Thornton." Source: http://Mc Vicker/history (web page on "History of Robinson Funeral Home")




Sources


1 Herman Geshwind, Old Pendelton District Database - a project of the Old Pendelton District Chapter of the South Carolina Genealogica Society..

2 J. Feagin, Gedcom from J. Feagin.

3 L. David Roper, RoperJr.ged from L. David Roper.

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